An improved prognosis

This is a follow-up to my post from two years ago, “Dealt a Blow“.

So, having had the subarachnoid haemorrhage in 2011 and a number of follow-up interventions in 2012 and 2013, it’s time for me to bring you up to date with what the hell is going on inside my skull.

My previous post got as far as me not looking forward to a further angiogram after the one in March 2013 showed that there was still some blood flowing inside my coiled aneurysm after having two coilings in 2011 and 2012.

Well, I flew back to London to get a further MRA in September 2013, and towards the end of the year got the results which said that I would have to have ANOTHER coiling via angiogram (my third), since the aneurysm wasn’t sufficiently blocked off. So I jetted off to London again in January 2014 (this time with girlfriend in tow) and underwent the coiling process via angiogram (under general anaesthetic) at what was becoming my regular haunt, the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in Bloomsbury.

Before, during and after a coiling of an aneurysm

It was around this time that I looked back to all the medical interventions I had since my original haemorrhage, wondering why it was proving so difficult to block the aneurysm completely. I reluctantly decided that I simply couldn’t risk training in the gym any more, no matter how light the regime. It seemed entirely possible that too much training was raising my blood pressure and preventing the total blocking-off of the aneurysm.

After I got home I learned that I would no longer be able to have follow-up MRA scans in the UK, I would have to have them in Malta. No problem, I thought, and called Malta’s national hospital to arrange one. Three weeks of complex negotiations, phone-call hopscotch and red tape cutting later, I finally got myself onto the patient list of a Maltese neurological consultant and had my first consultation in February 2014. They scheduled an MRA for July to review the most recent coiling.

This MRA in July 2014 was, believe it or not, the first time I had treatment in Malta since the original haemorrhage back in 2011. The results came through quite quickly (quicker than in the UK), and this time, FINALLY, it was good news. When I met my consultant in August 2014 she said that the aneurysm appeared to be totally blocked off, though they would need to send the images to the NHNN in London to get a second opinion.

This was done and in March 2015 I received my first ever official ‘All Clear’. The NHNN agreed that the MRA showed there was no blood flow in the aneurysm – the blood flow in the vessels of my brain were bypassing it completely. I would need annual MRAs to check all was still good, but no more angiograms would be on the immediate horizon.

You can imagine the level of relief I felt. Since 2011 during my initial recovery, the aneurysm had felt like a huge shadow stalking my every step through life, and now that has been lifted.

I still bear the invisible scars of the subarachnoid haemorrhage, like a lot of SAH survivors. My eyes get tired and vision gets blurry much more frequently, and I have a much harder time with bright lights and glare. My medium and long term memory is nowhere near as good as it used to be. I get dizzy spells. Once in a while I suffer a day or two of extreme physical fatigue when I can hardly support my own head. And of course I have to avoid heavy lifting and anything which is likely to increase my blood pressure. But I’m still here, and with this prognosis I’m likely to be still here for some time to come. That’s what’s important.

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